Birgit Knorr Receives the Prestigious Golden Poppy Award

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The Golden Poppy Award recognizes outstanding individuals, corporations, and organizations for their contributions of leadership, time, and/or financial resources to protecting and enhancing state parks and the California environment. One of this year's honorees is Birgit Knorr an active member of the Botany Society. 

Here are the comments about her award from the Volunteers Gala: "Birgit Knorr has dedicated so much to the Botany projects of the park, continued in effective leadership of the Botany Society, and has shown relentless passion and support in all her projects and presentations. She has spent countless hours documenting Mason Valley Cholla, the herbarium database, contributions for the cabinets, and recent work in Canebrake on tamarisk leading a community effort to export the efforts of the park into private land. Her dedication has spanned many changes of the Society and program. She continues to serve on the Steering Committee meeting as a seasoned and knowledgeable contributor. Her work continues this season in guiding weekly plant science discussions in Botany Study group and providing valuable input for the Certification Course planning."

Terry Hunefeld Receives a Golden Poppy Award

 Eschscholzia californica

Eschscholzia californica

The Golden Poppy Award recognizes outstanding individuals, corporations, and organizations for their contributions of leadership, time, and/or financial resources to protecting and enhancing state parks and the California environment. Botany Society member Terry Hunefield is one of this year's honorees.

Here are the comments about his award from the Volunteers Gala: "Terry Hunefeld was an invaluable contributor to the Botany program last year; namely showing up to nearly almost every class lecture/field trip, teaching lectures, mentoring new members, weighing in on important decisions and training development, photographing identifying and uploading hundreds of park plant observations to iNaturalist to a database both the SD Natural History Museum and the Park can use for management use, identifying and reporting new populations of invasives, leading plant walks, and generally inciting enthusiasm, curiosity, positivity and motivation in all new and old members to learn new plants and make observations. This season his contagious enthusiasm and high quality work has continued and spread in other ABDSP programs in naturalist society and outreach at the VC. He was recently elected as a Botany Society Steering Committee member for the 2018-2019 year."

Robin Connors To Speak at Botany Society Lecture Series in April

 Robin Connors,  Associate State  Archaeologist

Robin Connors,  Associate State  Archaeologist

Robin Connors is scheduled to provide a public lecture at the Botany Society Public Lecture Series. Her talk, Archaeology: From Agave to Zea Mays, complements her research on correlations between higher status habitation sites and the midden remains of larger and more sought-after marine mollusks. She will share her insights into the relationship between Anza Borrego's Native American peoples and their environment.  Robn will discuss how the Kumeyaay and Cahuilla used plants for food, clothing, medicine, shelter, fodder, fuel, furniture and even weapons.

Robin received her MA degree in Anthropology from San Jose State University after a career in public health laboratory services.  She is currently an Associate State Archaeologist for the California Department of Parks and Recreation, Colorado Desert District.  Her archaeological research focuses on the roles of gender and status in food procurement activities.

She enjoys thinking about, discovering and marveling at the adaptations and interactions of human beings with the extraordinary diversity of the life forms and landscapes that sustain them.

Who:     Robin Connors, Associate State Archaeologist, Colorado Desert District
What:    Botany Society Public Lecture Program
When:   Monday,  April 9, 2018; 10:00AM
Where:  Discovery Lab, Anza-Borrego Desert State Park® Visitor Center
Cost:     Free to the public

Birgit Knorr Is Recognized for Her Botany Work

  Cylindropuntia fosbergii

Cylindropuntia fosbergii

Birgit Knorr, a stellar active member of the Botany Society, was highlighted in a recent Observation of the Month by the San Diego Natural History Museum. 

Birgit has contributed over 200 observations of the elusive Mason Valley Cholla (Cylindropuntia fosbergii) using the digital application iNat on her smartphone.. Her observations constitute nearly half of all 450 observations of Mason Valley Cholla in San Diego County on iNat.

Birgit's observations, and others, help to refine the extent of the range of this narrow endemic which is on the California Native Plant Society Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants. As she has stated that she is "fascinated by Cylindropuntia fosbergii and wanted to map its range."

Huzzah Birgit!

This link will take you to Birgit's "observation of the month." 
Information courtesy of Millie Basden

Stephen Ingram Returns to Speak on Desert Succulents

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The Botany Society of the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park invites you to a public lecture by Stephen Ingram as he returns to present a free-to-the-public talk on native desert succulents, His talk is scheduled for March 12 in the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park® Visitor Center. Ingram’s presentation will be drawn from his book Cacti, Agaves and Yuccas of California Deserts in the park.

Stephen Ingram is a native Californian with an enduring interest in plants and plant ecology. He received a B.S. in biology from Lewis and Clark College and a M.A. in botany from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Following graduate school, Stephen worked as Herbarium Manager at Selby Botanical Gardens but now focuses on photography and writing. He also works part-time as a botanical consultant in the Eastern Sierra and the Mojave Desert. Stephen’s photos appear in numerous books, magazines, and calendars, and he has written many articles for scientific journals and magazines. He lives with his wife at 6500 feet on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada, in porcupine prickly-pear habitat.

Botanist, writer, and photographer Stephen Ingram traveled more than 30,000 miles – much of it on remote backroads – to search out, study, and photograph the cacti, agaves, and yuccas of California and Nevada. He also delved into the scientific literature, visited numerous herbaria, and interviewed our region’s leading experts on Cactaceae and Agavaceae. 

Who:     Stephen Ingram, photographer and biological consultant
What:    Botany Society Public Lecture Program
When:   Monday, March 12, 2018; 10:00AM
Where:  Discovery Lab, Anza-Borrego Desert State Park® Visitor Center
Cost:     Free to the public